What I write for?

At the start, I wanted to write to make myself read and heard, for social media is a great place for self expression. I never thought that I had something brilliant to say but the boiling sensation in me was, and is, an indicator that I should write.

My blogging journey began years ago out of desire to write. Little did I know that blogging was hard work and discipline. Little did I know that I will become an addict. So I read, I write and I share interesting posts I find here and there. Because I believe in sharing; generosity is a big value specially in a world of harsh competitiveness.

What I write for? My main question when my posts are not even viewed. On a deeper level, I write because it is therapeutical. Writing is a generous act. None of us would’ve learned anything hadn’t been great teachers and writers to share with us their knowledge through writings. It was ethically and intellectually therapeutical to them as well as it is for me.

The Healing of Philosophy

by John Clark Philosophy is in decline. You hear it all the time. The evidence is regularly trotted out: fewer graduates; no jobs; no prospects; a lack of interest from the culture, etc. It’s become a tedious verity. But hold on, how can that be? The oracle of the humanities cast out of public discourse, […]

The Healing of Philosophy

Sleep fall and anxiety etc.

Journaling about sleep fall and anxiety, family problems and personal ones helped not sleep fall the night before.

Putting words to feelings, verbalizing and objectification of one’s interiority are all of a big help.

Often, a problem requires not a radical devastating solution but a lukewarm one, at least for the near future. And oftentimes, lukewarm means hiding partly the truth. Lying can paradoxically save lives, so it’s not an absolute evil thing all the time.

Adaptation is an intelligent resilience.

Therapy through philosophy. a short explanation

original

A therapeutical approach through philosophy is not a new subject. Long forgotten, philosophy has developped into an increasing fragmentation of the subject, based on rationality and somehow quasi-scientific. Although philosophy is to be addressed to the masses, unfortunately only academics and amateurs can read it and understand it. However, that was not the case in ancient Greece.

Greek philosophers believed that philosophy (the love of wisdom) could help for a better living both on the individual and the collective levels. it was eudemonisitc (eudemonia in greek means happiness); happiness achieved through virtue and higher thinking. To say it differently, it was a rational approach to life. It taught control over passions, and ethics.

Roman philosophers were on this path too. The brilliant Seneca offered, and still do, a life coaching through his writings and advices. Letters to Lucilius is the book to read if one wants some counceling (trust me on this!).

Fast forward many centuries later, a philosophical councelling or consultancy emerged in some countries such as in Germany with Gerd Achenbach, in France with Oscar Brenifier and in USA with Lou Marinoff who defines this branch of philosophy as:

” a therapy for the sane”

Each counceling has a different method: it goes from formal logic to Socratic maieutic to Wittgenstein’s philosophical reflection and so on, always based on philosophical theories.

The benefits of the philosophical therapy are many. Most importantly, it teaches people to think logically and find their own answers. Sounds easy right? Not really. Besides, it is a shorter therapy then other forms of psychotherapy.