David Hume on thoughts and perceptions (original text)

“But setting aside some metaphysicians of this kind, I may venture to affirm of the rest of mankind, that they are nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with an inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement. Our eyes cannot turn in their sockets without varying our perceptions. Our thought is still more variable than our sight; and all our other senses and faculties contribute to this change; nor is there any single power of the soul, which remains unalterably the same, perhaps for one moment. The mind is a kind of theatre, where several perceptions successively make their appearance; pass, re-pass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations. There is properly no simplicity in it at one time, nor identity in different; whatever natural propension we may have to imagine that simplicity and identity. The comparison of the theatre must not mislead us. They are the successive perceptions only, that constitute the mind; nor have we the most distant notion of the place, where these scenes are represented, or of the materials, of which it is compos’d”.

DAVID HUME, A Treatise of Human Nature (1739), Book I: Of the understanding, Part IV: Of the sceptical and other systems of philosophy, Section VI: Of Personal Identity

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Reflections On Hume’s “Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion”-Part 2

“Our ideas reach no farther than our experience” _David Hume, Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion The statement shared above represents the principal doctrine of Hume’s empirical philosophy. According to this doctrine all human knowledge is empirical in character, which is to say that knowledge can only be acquired through sense perception and experience, and that which […]

Reflections On Hume’s “Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion”-Part 2

Reflections On Hume’s “Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion”-Part 1

“Surely, where reasonable men treat these subjects, the question can never be concerning the being but only the nature of the deity. The former truth, as you well observe, is unquestionable and self-evident. Nothing exists without a cause; and the original cause of this universe (whatever it be) we call God; and piously ascribe to […]

Reflections On Hume’s “Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion”-Part 1