How the War Made Wittgenstein the Philosopher He Was ‹ Literary Hub

A century ago, Ludwig Wittgenstein changed philosophy forever.

Wittgenstein’s field of interest is mainly language, communication, and the truth behind people’s interactions and understanding each other’s.

He said “What we can’t tell, should kept silent”; something to remind us the limit of language and the limit of the world.

In his quest for limits, he decided to enrol in the WWI to experience life when faced to death and that changed him for good.

This article describes the troubled and troubling thinker that he is and the main ideas of his theory:

“How the War Made Wittgenstein the Philosopher He Was ‹ Literary Hub” https://lithub.com/how-the-war-made-wittgenstein-the-philosopher-he-was/

Get to know Russell and Wittgenstein

Originally published in 1987, Bruce Duffy reimagined the lives of Bertrand Russell, G.E Moore and Ludwig Wittgenstein as they happened. Wittgenstein, a troubled and a troubling man, is a central figure in this biographical novel.

Between wars and peace during the 20th century, the lives and the minds of these great men were shaped and constantly changed depending on he general circumstances of the world back then.

This novel is a deep introduction to the theories of our heroes and a must read for those interested in them.

Hermetic Philosophy

This blog is by far one of the most interesting and original I have come through recently. Hermetics is an interpretation to all that exists. It is deeply thought, sometimes hard to understand and very mystical.

The Hermetics come straight out of ancient Egypt and ancient Greece.  It’s suppose to have been taught by Thoth himself.  I have recommended the book The Kybalion by the Three Initiates, but I thought I would explain the Hermetic Principals in a way everyone could understand.   To help you understand Hermetics think of the […]

Hermetic Philosophy

Dark Regions of The Country of The Mind

Originally posted on The Victor Negro: There are some happenings around you that will make you think that you are being wasted, being finished. You are living your life and doing what ought to be done to the best that you can, but something seems to be undermining you, something seems to be in resistance,…

Dark Regions of The Country of The Mind

Before Philosophy

Let’s spend a little time today on what Jean Gebser means by “unperspectival” consciousness, which is also, in many respects, what Nietzsche means by “Dionysian” consciousness, rather than “Apollonian” consciousness. For Dionysian consciousness, a formula for being like cogito ergo sum (or “I think therefore I am”) is absurd. We could just as well say […]

Before Philosophy

The rise of cognitive science: A survey of the most relevant historical landmarks

Perhaps you have heard someone talking of minds as computers. In Venezuela, it is common to hear people saying stuff like “let me process that” (déjame procesarlo) as if they were some sort of machine. But why do people sometimes think about themselves in this way? Why do some philosophers believe that minds are […]

The rise of cognitive science: A survey of the most relevant historical landmarks

Henri Bergson: the theory of the inner relativity

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painting by Steve Hester 

Henri Bergson was a French philosopher (1859-1941) and one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. His philosophy revolves around motion, change and evolution.

His work in Time and Free Will: An Essay on the Immediate Data of Consciousness showed the fundamental difference between time as perceived by consciousness (la durée or duration) and the objective mathematical time read on a watch. Consciousness doesn’t perceive the instant or the objective present, for it is infinitesimal. It perceives a duration which can be very long or very short.

For example, if I am working unwillingly for one hour on my blog, time doesn’t fly. On the contrary, if I love what I am doing on my blog, I will not feel the time passing by. Although, the time, in both cases,  is one hour and the same according to the watch, I live it, thus perceive it,  differently.

Bergson analyzed the awareness that man has of his inner self to show that psychological facts are qualitatively different from any other, charging psychologists in particular with falsifying the facts by trying to quantify and number them.

Based on this analysis of the subjective time versus the objective time, he somehow criticized Albert Einstein for keeping the theory of relativity external to the human mind without taking into consideration one’s inner perception of the time, which is also relative.

Consciousness is memory and therefore a link between past and future through its duration. This empirical complexity is what makes human free beings, forever preserving the past and anticipating the future.

If our legs belong to us, so do our thoughts, right?

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We use our legs to walk but we think with words. Our legs are ours, so is our body and the way we use it which is exclusively subjective. What about words? Are they ours or are they shared collectively throughout history?

Talking or writing gives us the feeling that words are ours. We use them through certain ways and styles. Think about poetry or storytelling: writers create worlds and words upon image creation. If this isn’t creativity what would it be?

So if we think with words and words are ours, are thoughts ours too? Is thinking a solitary activity such as walking or is it a collective sport?

Our world today seems to go for collective intelligence rather than individual solitary ones. Democracy then needs constant deliberations.  This means that, unlike our legs, words and thoughts became nowadays more collective than ever before.

However, there is a thin line between thinking and debating. If the latter is collective, thinking must remain solitary. The reason is that debating can’t take place unless there is an idea to discuss. More dangerously, it is even better not to think in a world inhabited by political ideologies.

All philosophers claimed the much needed solitude for thinking, as in stepping away from the world. This is where we vision the world from a distance and can redefine it. This is when thinking can be individual and subjective. And this is where we can use shared and inherited words the way we want to.

Thinking alone is testing the ability to think far from others. It is also a risk; one might lose, get lost or become depressed. How many times do we dread thoughts at night right before sleeping?

“Legs” and “thoughts” change constantly their meanings.