How the War Made Wittgenstein the Philosopher He Was ‹ Literary Hub

A century ago, Ludwig Wittgenstein changed philosophy forever.

Wittgenstein’s field of interest is mainly language, communication, and the truth behind people’s interactions and understanding each other’s.

He said “What we can’t tell, should kept silent”; something to remind us the limit of language and the limit of the world.

In his quest for limits, he decided to enrol in the WWI to experience life when faced to death and that changed him for good.

This article describes the troubled and troubling thinker that he is and the main ideas of his theory:

“How the War Made Wittgenstein the Philosopher He Was ‹ Literary Hub” https://lithub.com/how-the-war-made-wittgenstein-the-philosopher-he-was/

Get to know Russell and Wittgenstein

Originally published in 1987, Bruce Duffy reimagined the lives of Bertrand Russell, G.E Moore and Ludwig Wittgenstein as they happened. Wittgenstein, a troubled and a troubling man, is a central figure in this biographical novel.

Between wars and peace during the 20th century, the lives and the minds of these great men were shaped and constantly changed depending on he general circumstances of the world back then.

This novel is a deep introduction to the theories of our heroes and a must read for those interested in them.

If our legs belong to us, so do our thoughts, right?

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We use our legs to walk but we think with words. Our legs are ours, so is our body and the way we use it which is exclusively subjective. What about words? Are they ours or are they shared collectively throughout history?

Talking or writing gives us the feeling that words are ours. We use them through certain ways and styles. Think about poetry or storytelling: writers create worlds and words upon image creation. If this isn’t creativity what would it be?

So if we think with words and words are ours, are thoughts ours too? Is thinking a solitary activity such as walking or is it a collective sport?

Our world today seems to go for collective intelligence rather than individual solitary ones. Democracy then needs constant deliberations.  This means that, unlike our legs, words and thoughts became nowadays more collective than ever before.

However, there is a thin line between thinking and debating. If the latter is collective, thinking must remain solitary. The reason is that debating can’t take place unless there is an idea to discuss. More dangerously, it is even better not to think in a world inhabited by political ideologies.

All philosophers claimed the much needed solitude for thinking, as in stepping away from the world. This is where we vision the world from a distance and can redefine it. This is when thinking can be individual and subjective. And this is where we can use shared and inherited words the way we want to.

Thinking alone is testing the ability to think far from others. It is also a risk; one might lose, get lost or become depressed. How many times do we dread thoughts at night right before sleeping?

“Legs” and “thoughts” change constantly their meanings.