If our legs belong to us, so do our thoughts, right?

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We use our legs to walk but we think with words. Our legs are ours, so is our body and the way we use it which is exclusively subjective. What about words? Are they ours or are they shared collectively throughout history?

Talking or writing gives us the feeling that words are ours. We use them through certain ways and styles. Think about poetry or storytelling: writers create worlds and words upon image creation. If this isn’t creativity what would it be?

So if we think with words and words are ours, are thoughts ours too? Is thinking a solitary activity such as walking or is it a collective sport?

Our world today seems to go for collective intelligence rather than individual solitary ones. Democracy then needs constant deliberations.  This means that, unlike our legs, words and thoughts became nowadays more collective than ever before.

However, there is a thin line between thinking and debating. If the latter is collective, thinking must remain solitary. The reason is that debating can’t take place unless there is an idea to discuss. More dangerously, it is even better not to think in a world inhabited by political ideologies.

All philosophers claimed the much needed solitude for thinking, as in stepping away from the world. This is where we vision the world from a distance and can redefine it. This is when thinking can be individual and subjective. And this is where we can use shared and inherited words the way we want to.

Thinking alone is testing the ability to think far from others. It is also a risk; one might lose, get lost or become depressed. How many times do we dread thoughts at night right before sleeping?

“Legs” and “thoughts” change constantly their meanings.

 

9 thoughts on “If our legs belong to us, so do our thoughts, right?”

  1. One might consider that thoughts or “a thought” is not a philosophical object to begin with, but a sociological one, what German psychologist Karl Marbe calls a ,,Fremdeinstellung,” or borrowed attitude/disposition (ingrained, customary or transitive, through suggestion, priming, education, hypnosis and what not): More often than not a thought we call ours (“My thought is…”) is a replicate of a thought from amidst the group we live in. These are thoughts in the sociologial sense; philosophy being, in this context, meta-cognition, the way one deals with one’s sociological thoughts, which, as Heidegger stressed, is bound to remain unpractical in every sense of the word.

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